For The Billion | Martyn Sibley

This is an inspiring read, not only about overcoming adversity and learning to accept and persevere in life, but also explains what makes people disabled (the physical barriers like steps) and how everyone can play a part in changing the world we live in.

Martyn Sibley’s blog and story.

My personal story It was June 1999. There were wires and tubes coming out of my body everywhere. I was hallucinating. I was sure the nurse was my Irish grandma (who had passed away nearly 10 years before). Worst of all I was violently sick every hour, for days. I’d never been in hospital for… Continue Reading

Source: For The Billion | Martyn Sibley

This is on my 2018 wish list with my PA as it’s been nearly 2 decades since watching a live match so this article in the latest motability newsletter really has some useful tips!Going to a football match with a disability | Motability Scheme

Now the football season is in full swing, use our tips for heading to a game with a disability.

Source: Going to a football match with a disability | Motability Scheme

Parking Wars

I am the first to be frustrated by people who park like the photos below, blocking dropped kerbs and whole payments and it drives me insane the excuses you hear. Everybody seems so caught up in their own lives that as a society people forget their are others to think about. 

Yesterday a builder did it and as my daughter politely pointed out as we squeezed through cutting over plants the parking was rubbish. I said (as it was early) hopefully he’s just unloading and will move it later. Sadly not. For nearly 3 days a pavement was blocked and it didn’t need to be.

Today however as I was scooting home a BT Openreach van was blocking the pavement. Now I don’t like mentioning companies in my blog as they don’t necessarily have the opportunity to defend themselves, today though it is a positive story so credit where credit is due.  He was if there is such a thing as doing it perfectly blocking the pavement perfectly. Not only were signs up for pedestrians as a large hole was uncovered on the pavement but the man working was brilliant. He was keeping an eye out for pedestrians and with all the school traffic about he went into the road to ensure it was safe for me to go round his van, I couldn’t see past it so had no idea where the cars were. The man without needing to be asked, did it automatically and made sure I passed safely. It seems like a small thing for most people as you can step off the pavement and peer round vehicles however for me on my scooter I have no choice but to go into the road and today without the man’s help I would have literally been chancing passing the van to luck. 

It just goes to show that there is a right and a wrong way to do things, there are no excuses for bad parking, but workers who need to do a job could learn a lot from the BT man this morning. I like to give people the benefit of doubt especially when working, but your one or two seconds really can be the difference to someone’s life, trip out etc. I don’t always have my PA with me and I want to be able to be independent, I am however always dependent on a community having common sense.  It isn’t always easy but it can be done. 
Parking like this is however always a no, no, and can lead to you being prosecuted by the police. Worse though it can lead to someone feeling isolated in their community afraid to go out or in danger in the middle of the road. Please just stop and think when you park am I blocking pedestrians, wheelchairs, pushchairs dropped kerbs, would I want my child or relative put at risk. Never think I’ll only be a few minutes it won’t matter. It does it really does!  

If you come round the corner past the dropped kerb you are blocked and reversing on a pavement with children other people and families isn’t easy, and there’s no need to block the pavement
There is no excuse for this, not only was I blocked, parents with pushchairs had issues, and the bobbled pavement is designed to help those with visual impairments to cross

Imagine if you had crossed from here, you are visually impaired, in a road and then wham you are stuck!

The bad, the good and I guess it makes me the ugly…….

Yesterday my wife, LG and and Grandad took a trip to the cinema. This is no easy thing to organise in the first place. Our cinema choice is severely limited by access restrictions before even leaving the house. We have three in Norwich and one in Dereham. Dereham I am yet to try in my wheelchair however a recent purchase of a Spree book means this will change in the near future I am sure. Norwich is an issue as parking at two is limited which means only one really is an option for us. There is a multi storey car park nearby (within easy pushing/wheeling distance) and it has an abundance of disabled parking bays meaning it is ideal. Well in location at least.

It is an Odeon cinema and they have an extensive guide online, they tell you all about their wheelchair spaces, their premier seats and so on. Unfortunately in the Norwich one at least they don’t have premier seats that are accessible in many if any screens, I cannot sit in my wheelchair at the front of a huge cinema looking up to watch a film. The pain is unbearable, it leaves me with the choice of watch the film in pain or drag myself up stairs to comfy seats and watch the film in pain. Not much of a choice really. I have tried to call and speak to a person, but no efficiencies mean that it is an automated service. I had similar issues when trying to book seats for the Star Wars premieres, I cannot book me, a carer and 2 “normal” seats. I am becoming increasingly frustrated with cinema trips, they are anything but relaxing.

Follow this up with our lunch at Frankie & Benny’s, Riverside, Norwich and it was a completely different story. Usually I arrive at a restaurant and immediately a table is set and a chair removed for me to wheel up to the table. Now I’m not saying this isn’t good service, it is. However most restaurants miss one vital step, that is asking me if I can transfer out of my wheelchair (which I can) and whether I would rather sit in my chair or at the table. Why you ask, well wheelchairs aren’t designed to be sat at a restaurant table easily, I am often knocked or get my handles bashed, not fun whilst you are eating, and also because some chairs are more comfortable to sit on when eating. I want to give the staff here for top marks, first of all for asking the question, and secondly for asking me the question not the person who was pushing me. Top marks for awareness here. A simple, can you transfer from your wheelchair sir? and this is your table would you like to transfer and we can take your chair or stay in it were two fantastic questions and I wish I had taken the name of the staff to thank them properly. It is a small thing but it shows fantastic awareness. MY chair is my legs when I go out but I am not super glued to it. The Odeon could learn from this and offer alternative access/design and more comfortable seating options in their screens.

That leaves me the ugly, not much more I can say really………………..

Why Pavement Blocking is an issue for people.

Below is a link to the first ever video I have uploaded to you tube and social media. With it I posted the attached message

This morning I took this video showing why pavement blocking is a serious matter for disabled people and that they can’t just go down a dropped kerb when their path is blocked, sometimes you can’t see things blocking you and there is nowhere to get off the pavement. As we cut across the garden my 4 year old was saying how bad the parking was and how dangerous it was and that she felt naughty walking on someone else’s garden, she was right on all counts. This vehicle was blocking the whole pavement despite the road being plenty wide enough to not need to do it. I have deliberately not zoomed in on the van as this isn’t about slating a company it is about educating people as to why you can’t just step/wheel into the road as there is not always a dropped kerb to wheel down and for others there is no view to safely go into the road and round the obstruction. Had the garden had a little wooden fence like the first one in the video we would have been stuck. My daughter would have been guiding me back to a dropped kerb and we would have been late for nursery. All because someone didn’t think. So when you park, stop, check the road, is it wide enough to not need to be on the pavement, if it isn’t make sure the path isn’t blocked. If you are delivering goods to work I understand drop them off, have some one there to advise people and then move as soon as possible. This vehicle wasn’t unloading and had been there 30+ minutes before I took my video.

The video isn’t intended to cast any bad aspersions on the person who parked there just to highlight the difficulties it can create. I will be the first to admit that before I became disabled I didn’t think about this when parking and it is only now I realise the issues it causes people. This is why I took the video. It is intended to educate not castigate. The van is still parked there some 3 hours later 😦